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ARRL DX SSB Contest This Weekend. Starts at 7:00 PM EST on Friday, and ends on Sunday at 6:59 PM EST.

Objective: To encourage W/VE stations to expand knowledge of DX propagation on the HF and MF bands, improve operating skills, and improve station capability by creating a competition in which DX stations may only contact W/VE stations.

W/VE amateurs work as many DX stations in as many DXCC entities as possible on the 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meter bands.

DX stations work as many W/VE stations in as many of the 48 contiguous states and provinces as possible.

For more information visit: http://www.arrl.org/arrl-dx

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The ARRL is asking members to comment by April 19 on possible changes to the League’s HF Band Plans suggested by the HF Band Planning Committee. The survey is part of the committee’s efforts to tweak the band plans for the RTTY/data/CW portions of 80 through 10 meters — excepting 60 meters. The committee developed its suggested revisions to the voluntary band plans after reviewing some 400 member comments in response to a March 2014 solicitation that sought suggestions for using the spectrum more efficiently so that data modes may coexist compatibly.

“The committee concluded that most of the concerns voiced by members could be addressed by modest adjustments to the existing band plans, and mainly by confining data modes with bandwidths greater than 500 Hz to the FCC-designated segments for automatically controlled digital stations (ACDS) and to parts of the RTTY/data subbands above those segments,” ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ said. His article detailing the committee’s suggestions will appear in the April edition of QST.

The proposed changes differentiate among ACDS, narrow RTTY/data modes having a bandwidth no greater than 500 Hz, and wider data modes having a bandwidth up to 2700 Hz.

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Page 46 of the USMC Radio Operator’s Handbook

To learn how the U.S. Marine Corps teaches (or used to teach) about radio operation theory take a look at the USMC Radio Operators Handbook.

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There’s a lot to learn from this 1966 Army training film about the International Morse Code, but the most crucial component of good keying is rhythm.

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Earl (KR2L) submitted the link: http://www.ac6v.com/history.htm

This page has a detailed list of events that outline the beginnings of the Ham Radio hobby.

To submit links and articles send an email with the information to:
webmaster at k2jii dot org

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“Welcome to the Vintage Radio and Communications Museum of Connecticut,” is the headline on the museum’s website. The site also says, “Our volunteers are happy to give personal tours,” and that’s what today’s two videos are personal tours of the museum conducted by volunteer Bernie Michaels, known in ham radio circles as W2LFV.

(Video Link 1) (Video Link 2)

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Tired of looking at confusing band condition information? Visit: www.bandconditions.com

This experimental website developed by K5BIZ will help you maximize your ham radio experience. It can also be used to determine band conditions for Nets and casual QSO’s. The information provided on www.bandconditions.com is NOT based on software predictions or any kind of satellite based readings. It’s is based on a new Ionospheric sounding method called “HF Ionospheric Interferometry” which operates very similarly to the PolSAR system used by NASA.

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HamRadioCoin or HRC is a virtual currency. It is based on a decentralized peer-to-peer payment network. It is managed by its users without any unique authority or broker. It is intended to be used by anyone but primarily targeted ham radio operators.

HRC can be used to help spread the word of ham radio to people that otherwise would not know about the hobby and to introduce ham radio operators to the world of crypto-currencies. One of the interesting aspects of HRC is that it can be used to receive or send founds via ham radio using the digital mode PSK-63. Watch this video with a demonstration on how the exchange works.

How does it work?

From the user point of view, HamRadioCoin is nothing more than an application or computer program that provides access their personal HamRadioCoin portfolio. This application allows users to send and receive HRC to vendors or other users.

The authenticity of each transaction is protected by digital signatures that match the address of the sender, allowing all users to have full control over each HamRadioCoin sent or received by their personal addresses. In addition, anyone can process transactions using the computational power of their specialized hardware for rewards. This is often called a “mining”.

For more information visit the HamRadioCoin frequently asked questions page.

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