The ARRL has launched a new online resource that allows users to take randomly generated practice exams using questions from the actual examination question pool. ARRL Exam Review for Ham Radio™ is free, and users do not need to be ARRL members. The only requirement is that users must first set up a site login (this is a different and separate login from your ARRL website user registration).

“The ARRL’s online Exam Review is designed to help license examination candidates review their progress as they study,” said ARRL Marketing Manager Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R. “As you complete a chapter or section of a license manual, you can turn to the online program to review all of the related questions taken directly from the examination question pool. After answering each question — right or wrong — the correct answer is shown, and a page reference to the license manual is displayed for further review.”

Continue reading..

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Cheap homebrew antenna for working the Satellites on FM. Dave (KG0ZZ) Shows his inexpensive antenna design used to communicate with satellites. Dave has many other antenna designs and projects. Be sure and subscribe to his YouTube channel!


httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy_XwvMmIro

Final Antenna dimensions:
Antenna Dimensions

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An individual who had been jamming cellphone traffic on interstate 4 in Florida was located by FCC agents with the assistance of Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Deputies. The individual had reportedly been jamming cellphone traffic on I-4 for two years. The FCC is now proposing a $48,000 fine for his actions. They say the jamming ‘could and may have had disastrous consequences by precluding the use of cell phones to reach life-saving 9-1-1 services provided by police, ambulance, and fire departments.

UPDATE 5/2/2014: Man was tracked down. Read the full article.

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The Mohawk Valley Amateur Radio Association (MVARA), our neighbors to the south updated their website.

We encourage everyone to visit and bookmark it: http://qsl.net/kc2auo.

MVARA maintains the KC2AUO repeater: 147.195+ CTCSS: 156.7Hz and the Packet Node: KC2AUO on 146.445

For those who don’t know Tryon ARC works very closely with neighboring clubs. The reason for this is emergencies do not know county borders and in the event of a disaster we most likely will end up working with other clubs in the area providing emergency communication assistance.

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This video showcases the “Dorothy Grant Elementary School Ham Radio Club” K6DGE. In the video you will be able to see elementary age kids making contacts and learning about the hobby. The ARRL has an Outreach to Teachers and Schools page in case this is something you want to implement in your schools.


httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bpm0taet-0I

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A few dozen special event stations will take to the air April 26, 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC, to commemorate International Marconi Day (IMD). Among them will be GB4IMD, in Cornwall, England, OE14M, in Vienna, Austria, IY0IMD in Italy, VO1AA, on Signal Hill in St Johns, Newfoundland, VK2IMD in Australia, and WA1WCC on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. All stations planning to participate are urged to register. A list of registered participants is on the IMD 2014 website.

International Marconi Day is a 24 hour Amateur Radio event held annually to celebrate the birth of Guglielmo Marconi on April 15, 1874. IMD is held each year on a Saturday close to Marconi’s birthday, with Amateur Radio stations on the air from around the world, including some Award Stations operating from historically significant sites.

The event is not a contest; it is an opportunity for amateurs around the world to make point-to-point contact with historic Marconi sites using HF communications techniques similar to those used by Marconi, and to earn an award certificate for working or hearing a requisite number of Marconi stations.

— Thanks to The Daily DX; International Marconi Day

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An interesting tip that might just improve the performance of those small affordable handheld ham radios called a “Handy Talky” or HT for short in ham vernacular. [RadioHamGuy] posted an interesting video on adding a counterpoise antenna wire to an HT. He claims it will noticeably improve both transmit and receive by making a quarter-wave monopole into a makeshift dipole antenna system.

Per his instructions you basically add a short wire to the antenna’s outer ground connection or to an equivalent case screw that’s electrically connected to the antenna’s ground side. Apparently this can be referred to as a Tiger Tail and does make it look like your HT has a tail. You would construct a counterpoise antenna wire 11.5 inch for VHF, 6.5 for UHF and about 19.5 inches for an OK performing dual band VHF/UHF radio.

Normally with a handheld radio the counterpoise (ground) is your own body as you are holding the HT. This is because the capacitance of your body makes a good counterpoise under normal conditions. It would be interesting to hear what others find for performance when adding a counterpoise antenna wire.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szmQmCn1tH4

Source: HackADay

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Developed in the 1830s and 1840s by Samuel Morse (1791-1872) and other inventors, the telegraph revolutionized long-distance communication. It worked by transmitting electrical signals over a wire laid between stations. In addition to helping invent the telegraph, Samuel Morse developed a code (bearing his name) that assigned a set of dots and dashes to each letter of the English alphabet and allowed for the simple transmission of complex messages across telegraph lines. In 1844, Morse sent his first telegraph message, from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, Maryland; by 1866, a telegraph line had been laid across the Atlantic Ocean from the U.S. to Europe. Although the telegraph had fallen out of widespread use by the start of the 21st century, replaced by the telephone, fax machine and Internet, it laid the groundwork for the communications revolution that led to those later innovations.Here are the lessons for the International Morse Code Course! This course is designed to help learn the Morse Code from the easiest to the hardest characters. This course covers all 26 letters of the English alphabet, numbers 0 to 9, some punctuation marks, as well as some procedural signals. This course is designed for Amateur Radio operators, but feel free to use it for what ever reason you may need to learn Morse Code. You can find the answers to all the Random Runs found at the end of the lessons at the lessons’ links below. More..

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