Repeaters: 146.700- Mhz | 146.970- Mhz | 443.700+ Mhz | 445.075- Mhz | PL: 100 hz

Flannel NET, 10M Net 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month, 7:00PM

We would like to introduce the new HF 10 meters net. It will take place on the 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month at 7:00 p.m EST. This is NOT an ARES/RACES net, just a club net.

The following is the script to follow so everyone is familiar with the format.

Opening the Net:

Approximately at 18:45 hrs tune to the net frequency of 28.420 MHz and see if the frequency is clear. If not look for a clear frequency as close to 28.420 Mhz as possible. At this point you should make an announcement on the 146.700 and 146.970 repeaters letting everyone know of the frequency change. If possible, post the new frequency to the club Facebook page http://www.fb.com/k2jji.

If time permits, you can begin taking early check-ins as HF conditions could make taking checkins a longer process then when using a repeater. Tip: If you can start up a QSO with one of the check-ins prior to 7pm, you will establish the use of the frequency and make the net more successful when it’s time to start at 7pm.

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New Broadcastify audio stream for K2JJI and other local repeaters

TROYN would like to give thanks to Scott W8NUD for providing the new Broadcastify audio feed.
Broadcastify provides audio feeds from all over the US, there are mobile apps for all platforms to listen to the streams from any location of the world with cellular data or internet coverage.

Scott’s stream provides audio stream of the following frequencies:

TRYON (K2JJI) – 146.700, 146.970, 443.700, 445.075
MVARA (N2MNT) – 147.195
Cherry Valley (NC2C) – 145.350

Thanks!


Tiny CW Capacitive Touch Paddle

Capacitive Touch morse code paddle using an ATTiny4 – (126 Bytes)

Introduction:

I (Edgar/KC2UEZ) am a ham radio operator. I like building antennas, experimenting with digital modes, and operating SDRs. Like many no-code operators, after being on the air for a while, I developed an interest and appreciation for Morse Code. I started to learn CW by using http://LCWO.net. I purchased a cheap paddle, but I found the clicking noise a little bit annoying. At this moment, I decided that I wanted to create a noise-free way to send Morse Code.

While I was able to find a few touch paddles (without moving parts) that I could purchase, I ultimately decided to make my own. I saw this project as an opportunity to do some hacking and to learn something new along the way.

While researching capacitive touch online, I came across this Arduino playground post: http://playground.arduino.cc/Code/CapacitiveSensor. To get my project underway I modified the code to implement the paddle logic and loaded it into an Arduino. The code reads two input pins. If touch is detected by the micro-controller, the Arduino outputs two signals to toggle the transistors, which simulates a closed circuit, similar to that of a mechanical paddle. The closed circuit enables the radio to create the DIT and DAH tones. The under 1kB binary code worked well and without error. This made me wonder how small I could make this code. After optimizing the code, I managed to shrink it to under 512 bytes.

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Suggested 2m local radio frequncies

Tryon ARC has created a list of suggested frequencies for the 2m band. Feel free to program these frequencies and use them. Those frequencies have good coverage for the Fulton and Montgomery counties. If you have any corrections or have other frequency suggestions feel free to post it below or on our facebook page.

The frequency list can also be found on the ARES/RACES page with the manuals for the radios FT2800 and IC718 which are the radios in the EOC radio room.